Space

The aesthetics of the space itself perfectly matches the philosophy of the gallery.

Eleni Marneri Galerie is located in the south of the Acropolis of Athens.

The abundant light, the sense of transparency, and the reflections are primary virtues of the space since the whole facade of the gallery is covered by glass. The entire building is designed by the well-known architectural office ISV, which is distinguished for its pioneering works and anthropocentric approaches.
The interior of the gallery has been curated by Nikomachi Karakostanoglou, a constant collaborator and friend of Eleni Marneri. The space has full contact with the external environment, in contrast to the introversion of the previous space in Agathoupoleos str, Kypseli. The gallery is divided into small separate parts, which each possesses its own dynamics.

An exciting characteristic of the gallery space is the connection with the Late Roman period, thanks to the remains of an urban mansion, and its beautiful mosaics. In ancient times this place was within the Classical city walls. A rescue excavation on the lot on Lebessi and Porinou streets brought to light building remains dating from the Late Geometric Period (770-700 BC) to Late antiquity (4th /5th century AD). The polychrome mosaic floor, which is part of the 4th century villa (villa urbana) and features geometric and floral motifs, is preserved till now. Other parts of what was probably the same residence were discovered in 1968-1969 at 19-27 Makrygianni Street.

Some scholars believe that during Roman times the region south of the Acropolis was a residential area for members of the upper class, representatives of the Athenian political and intellectual elite. Although this area remained outside the fortification walls following the destructive invasion of Athens in 267 AD by the Herulians (an ancient Germanic tribe), during 4th century AD (an era of recovery for the city), luxurious urban residences with private baths and household sanctuaries continued to be built here. Some buildings may have housed private schools.

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